Deutch Italiano Franšais Espa˝ol
BOOK ONLINE NOW
Be the first to receive our special offers

Croke Park

Croke Park is a sports stadium located in Dublin, Since 1884 it has been used primarily by the GAA to host Gaelic, most notably the annual finals of the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship and Senior Hurling Championship.

Croke Park started out as a small stadium and had only two stands on and grassy banks all round. In 1917, the rubble from the Easter Rising of 1916 was used to construct a grassy hill on the railway end of Croke Park to afford patrons a better view of the pitch, which hosted all major football and hurling matches. This terrace is now known as Hill 16.

In the 1920s the GAA set out to create a high capacity stadium at Croke Park. Following the Hogan Stand, the Cusack Stand, named after Michael Cusack from Clare (who founded the GAA and served as its first secretary), was built in 1927. 1936 saw the first double-deck Cusack Stand open with 5,000 seats, and concrete terracing being constructed on Hill 16. In 1952 the Nally Stand was built in memorial of Paddy Nally, another of the GAA founders. Seven years later, to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the GAA, the first cantilevered "New Hogan Stand" was opened.

Following a redevelopment programme started in the 1990s, Croke Park now has a capacity of 82,300, making it the fourth largest stadium in Europe and the current largest stadium in the Six Nations Championship. It is also used as a major Music Venue to host concerts by major international acts including, Westlife, U2, Take That and many more and it hosted the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2003 Special Olympics.

Also housed in Croke Park is the GAA Museum. On view are Historic exhibits and data-packs which  provide an insight to the past and present of Irish Life and Heritage. Touch screen technology brings you the historic moments of great names and games over the years.

New to Croke Park is the Ehihad Skyline Tour, where accompanied by an experienced tour guide, visitors ascent to a walkway 44 metres above the ground to take in panoramic views of the Irish capital and find out more about Dublin’s key landmarks.